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Hario Cold Brew Pot

SKU# CPO850A0320

Availability: In Stock

$16.00

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$16.00

Quick Overview

Hario's Cold Brew Pot and Mini Pot are designed with classic engineering details to ensure that maximum flavor is extruded from every grain of coffee placed in its suspended filter.
Hario Cold Brew Pot Coffee Maker

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  Description    Specs    Ask a Question    Resources    Reviews  

The Hario Cold Brew Pot and the Mini Pot coffee makers are so sleekly modern you might glimpse one in a futuristic sci-fi flick set in Tokyo in 2020. Hario's Cold Brew Coffee Pots are designed with classic engineering details to ensure that maximum flavor is extruded from every grain of coffee placed in their suspended filters. Unlike other presses, the Hario takes cold or room temperature water and yeilds cold brewed coffee in 12-24 hours. It is the perfect quality and flavor for iced coffee drinks. The Mini Pot brews 1-2 cups of coffee. The larger size brews 2-4 cups of coffee. Learn more about the Hario Cold Brew Coffee Pot:

How the Hario Cold Brew Pot Works

  • Using coarse-ground coffee, fill the nylon filter basket until you've reached the top of the filter itself, leaving room at the top.
  • Pour filtered, cold or room temperature water over the grounds.
  • Leave to steep for 12-24 hours, less or more to taste.
  • Refrigerate completed coffee in a sealed container for up to one month.
Pros
  • Versatile: Can Make A Great Concentrate For Hot Coffee Later
  • Flavorful: Rich Delicious Brew
  • Convenience: Easy to Clean
Cons
  • Caution:Glass, Handle with Care!
Ease of Use 5
Ease of Care and Maintenance 5
Overall Value for the Money 5
How Does it Compare?

The Hario Cold Brew Pot has the ability to brew different grinds thanks to different size mesh.

Tips and Tricks

Let the Hario Cold Brew Pot sit overnight for a strong concentrate and dilute with hot water for a low acid cup of coffee.

Width 600 ml: 5.5 inches | 1,000 ml: 5.5 inches
Depth 600 ml: 3.5 inches | 1,000 ml: 5 inches
Height 600 ml: 8.125 | 1,000 ml: 12 inches
Material Glass
Manufacturer Hario

Submit a question directly to owners of this product and ask what they think about it!

 

Hario Cold Brew Pot
Already Asked: 10 Questions, 83 Answers
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Weiss asked: Do you let the brew sit at room temperature 12-24 hours or in the fridge while brewing? Jul 30, 2014
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Annie H: I let mine sit in the fridge for 24 hrs. I don't have to worry about it going bad, getting knocked over, etc. I use this to make iced coffee exclusively, so for me, it's also perfect b/c it's cold and perfectly concentrated the next day. You can leave it sitting at room temperature, but if you do, you don't need to let it brew as long (I do 8-10 hrs). Aug 1, 2014
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Gwen D: I sit it out at room temperature....time depends on how strong you prefer your coffee...just remember to add hot water to the brew to adjust your strength of the final product. I really enjoy the coffee from this as there is minimum acid from my Starbuck Brand coffee. Aug 2, 2014
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Michael G: I put it in the fridge for at about 24 hours, and then serve it with ice. The result is still not so strong that it has to be diluted. At 12 hours I need to add a shot of espresso to get it to where I like it.
That said it makes good ice coffee.
Jul 30, 2014
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Alan S: I stir the grounds while slowly adding water and let it sit in the fridge. If left at room temperature the wet grounds will eventually start to mold. There are probably some spores long before fuzz is visible so keep it chilled. Jul 30, 2014
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Angella K: Let the brew sit in the fridge 12-24 after filling the container with room temp water...even after 8 hours, it's usually pretty tasty if you don't have a full 12 hours to spare. Aug 1, 2014
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terry s: fridge, although I don't think it is imperative. I just like cold coffee.

the whole advantage of cold brewing is it doesn't get acidic like hot brewing does.
Jul 30, 2014
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Kate E: Hi - I actually brew directly in the refrigerato

If you youtube hario cold brew - ritual coffee has good video

Kate
Jul 31, 2014
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RYAN Y: I usually put it in the fridge. I have done it on the counter but I feel like the cold brew lasts longer when brewed in the fridge. Jul 30, 2014
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Ginger P: Oh yes, after the 24 hour room temp brew, I then refrigerate the concentrate and use it over the next several days. Jul 30, 2014
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Brian G: In the Fridge! Great way to go through older beans that pile up, and it lasts do three four days, Cheers Jul 30, 2014
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Ginger P: I have tried both. I really prefer room temp and 24 hours - that combo seems to hit the sweet spot. Jul 30, 2014
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Robert P: I use it at room temp, then put it in fridge after brewing, much better than hot brewqed!
BoB
Jul 30, 2014
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Terry M: Putting the coffee in the fridge directly seems to present a rather weak brew. Jul 30, 2014
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MICHAEL B: In the fridge. Maybe I'll try it the other way. You've got me thinking. Jul 30, 2014
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Scott M: I use cool water and let it sit at room temperature for 30 hours. Jul 30, 2014
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Phillip C: I brew it for 24 hrs. On the counter top,then put it the frig. Jul 30, 2014
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Kandis H: I did both and normally brewed it for 10 hours. Jul 30, 2014
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Marc L: fridge (which is why it's called cold brew) Jul 30, 2014
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Barbara B: I brew at room temperature. Jul 30, 2014
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Rafael D: I leave mine in the fridge Jul 30, 2014
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Cale S: In the fridge Jul 30, 2014
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Ben M: Room temp Jul 30, 2014
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Georgio Testani T: Fridge Jul 30, 2014
A shopper asked: I was wondering if anyone could help me out, Im a rookie to the Hario game and I was wondering the best coffee for this pot. I just started to drink coffee and I was hooked. Should I buy the beans and a grinder or what? I would appreciate all the help. Jul 21, 2013
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Scott W: In my opinion the "best coffee" for this pot will be a combination of 1) grind and 2) beans/roast
I believe the key to getting full flavor extraction with the Hario is to use coarsely ground coffee. I usually buy my beans and grind it at wholefoods. simply set their machine to the "coarse" grind. First batch I made with coffee ground for drip machine did not extract nearly enough flavor. Otherwise, the only other tip I'd give is to stir the grounds once you add water to the Hario.

in terms of flavors:
I found that using espresso roast from Wholefoods (coarse grind) produces a nice smooth cold brew coffee with chocolate notes.
The Colombian beans I typically like for making a smooth, low acid hot coffee produce a bright (not quite acidic) tasting cold brew coffee.
Ethiopian beans produced a cold brew with a nice earthiness to it.
I've only had the machine for a couple weeks. I'll continue to experiment with beans and brew time on each new batch I make.
Jul 23, 2013
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BRANDON D: I have this pot and love it but I also stick to some simple guidelines. I always use filtered water and always grind the beans directly before using them. I've found that those two things get me delicious and very fresh coffee. As for beans, I'm a fan of Intelligentsia's Black Cat espresso blend, but I also use Anodyne's Atomic Blend. In a pinch I've actually used Starbucks's whole bean espresso from the grocery store which came out acceptable. As for the grind I have a crappy cheap grinder that cannot do a fine grind but it's perfect for this pot. If you're a heavy drinker you may want to consider the larger of the two available sizes for this pot. I'm a moderate coffee drinker and the amount of coffee this pot yields lasts me 2 days. Jul 22, 2013
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Rachel M: The design of this is awesome; the thin membrane filter allows any kind of coffee to be used. I've been using Umbria's Bizarri regular grind. I happened to get a course grind (for a french press) to see if i noticed a difference, and did not (and just using umbria because i have a good connection and get my orders when roasted).

If you want to experiment more, getting your own grinder would be the way to go, however, one reason i bought this was for the ease of use and couldn't be happier. I used to fiddle around with beans and grinds, but since most of us have access to really fresh roasted beans, having a company grind them for you makes it that much easier.

Good luck!
Jul 22, 2013
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Jonathan L: This particular pot seems to work well with any bean, ground coarse. I've used various types of roast and found success. I've gone light to dark, espresso and even tried a New Orleans type roast and it works really well.

I've typically allowed the grounds to steep at least over night, but on average about 24 hours. I'm not sure if that amount of time really helps or anything, but it seems to yield a good and consistent cold brew each time.

Hope this helps and welcome to the world of Hario and cold brew!
Jul 22, 2013
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Teresa B: Depends on your taste. I only use my cold brew in the summer and usually it's just for making coffee ice cream. I don't bother grinding the beans for ice cream, but I do try to buy a good local brand. That said, I will grind fresh for my daily coffee (the more often I drink it, the more it's worth to me to go the extra effort). I'm in NY and I buy my beans from a local roaster. For me, buying fresh (vs. grocery store stock) has been the 'best flavor' trick. Jul 22, 2013
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Sam W.: You always want to grind your own beans. It will be the best way to improve your coffee. This pot is specifically designed for cold brew which you will want a very coarse grind for, and room temperature water for 12-24 hours. It isn't meant for hot water. Generally cold brew coffees stay fresh 1-2 weeks and are served cold. I like coffees which are very fruity and/or naturally sweet, but that's to taste. Jul 23, 2013
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Mary K: True coffee snobs would say to freshly grind the beans yourself before brewing but I don't have a grinder so I buy coffee beans that I have ground (course) at the grocery. My grocery has a fabulous selection of different types of beans and I've had success with this. I keep my unused grounds in the freezer to keep them fresher. So far I'm satisfied! Jul 22, 2013
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Annie C: The Hario pots use quite a bit of coffee at a time so I just buy ground coffee (I've actually been buying decaf cuz the Hario brews extra caffeinated coffee and I don't need that much of a kick). A lot of the subtle flavors of the many blends of coffee available these days are more "tasteable" when you use this method of brewing. Enjoy! Jul 22, 2013
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Vicki K: I'm not a high-end coffee connoisseur, like probably others who shop here, but I generally use ground coffee that I grind at the store myself. (My grinder isn't that great so I rarely grind my beans at home.) I think, though, most folks would recommend you grind your own beans. Good luck! Jul 22, 2013
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Shaun A: Hello, I've been using fine ground espresso coffee with no problem, also I've used some regular grind coffee and had good results. I do however let mine steep for 24hrs because I like it quite concentrated. Hope this answer is helpful. Jul 22, 2013
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Lily S: Hi, I got this brew pot and I 'm using whole beans, grind them to coarse size. In my opinion is tastier to grind the beans at home . Jul 22, 2013
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Ann Marie P: We use our burr grinder and set it on the coarse grind. We are very happy with our coffee this way. Jul 22, 2013
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Pippy P asked: For those of you with the large (1000 ml) size: what are some ways to make the coffee stronger? It's coming out too weak for my taste.

Here's my current method:

- Medium-coarse grind (somewhere between press and drip)
- Dump all the coffee in at once, filling the filter to top of the mesh part (rather than measuring 80g or whatever)
- Pouring water through the filter a little at a time, stirring a bit with each pour using a chopstick
-Refrigerating and allowing to brew for approx. 12 hours

Thoughts?
Jun 26, 2013
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Ben M: You will enjoy the larger pot because it makes more coffee. I don’t think if makes any difference as to pot size.
You should try my method. I roamed the net, found someone's method, modified it a bit, and that's what I use.

Caution. This is a glass coffee pot. Do not bump. Do not subject to direct flame or heat. Do not subject to extreme temperatures. Do use metal utensils with this pot. Do not use if pot becomes cracked or damaged. Do not poke or puncture the filter or filter assembly. Hand wash only. Use only soft sponges and cool soapy water. Use mild liquid detergent only. Use no abrasive materials nor scrub pads. NOT dishwasher safe. Hand wash the pot and all components in cool soapy water. Rinse well and allow to air dry.
Making your coffee: Use coarse or "French Press" ground coffee in your Hario Cold Brew system. The grind you want is usually the coarsest on commercial grinder in the store.
1. Fill your Hario glass pot to the 800 ml line with quality cool water. At least use a Pur or Brita filter to remove total dissolved solids.
2. Fill the filter assembly with ground coffee just until the filter mesh is totally covered.
3. Place the filter assembly into the glass pot.
4. Pour additional water through the grounds until the glass pot is completely full and grounds are wet. I spend some time gently stirring the coffee with a chopstick to insure all the grounds get wet.
6. Keep Hario on kitchen counter for up to 12 hours and loosely put a piece of plastic wrap over the top. If you'd like a stronger steep, place the pot in the fridge and allow to chill for up to 24 hours, but I’ve never need to do this. I go 12 hours on the counter. No more than 75 degrees F, though.
7. Remove the filter, put in a resealable glass jar, and keep it in the fridge. The Hario top is not airtight and you don’t want onions or whatever to flavor your brew. Your cold brew will store in the fridge for up to a week or two.
Jun 27, 2013
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terry s: the problem is the coffee forms a crust out of the water after a certain amount of time. I make my coffee in the morning & when I get home from work I break the crust & stir the coffee 'mud' a bit to re-energize the mix. you'll sometimes even see darker coffee inking thru the filter to prove this works.

the problem with the larger hario pot is the filter basket size is exactly the same as the smaller pot. so the coffee will be diluted comparatively. I would stick with finer grounds & really dark coffees. can't really say for certain since I have the smaller hario pot.
Jun 27, 2013
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Ginger P: I have the smaller pot however, my research found the "sweet spot" was 24 hours and I do not refrigerate until after I have completed the 24 hour cold (really room temp) brew part. Otherwise, I do everything else the same as you describe. HTH! I absolutely love my Hario! It's all I drink, now. Jun 27, 2013
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RYAN Y: I have have the large hario and I usually make my grinds around medium, if it's a darker roast more coarse. I do exactly what you do when adding the coffee but when I add te water I don't stir with a chop stick because a lot of the really fine grinds go through the filter and make my cold brew go sour/bitter faster. I'm not sure why. I used to stir but no more. I also let mine sit for 16 hours, sometimes even longer. you kind of have to fiddle with it to get the right brew time. I've tried 12-24 hours and it all depends I the coffee. sometimes it's delicious at 12 but way more tasty at 24. I hope that helps a bit. good luck. Jun 27, 2013
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Dennis L: I do the same thing, but if I only have 12 hours I put in the cupboard not the fridge. If I have 24 hours I put in the fridge. It does seem to make it a little stronger. Hope this helps.
Cheers!
Jun 29, 2013
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Kevin C: Sometimes I let it "brew" in the refrigerator for 36 hours or so. It will never taste like strong hot brewed coffee, however. It's just the nature of the technique. Jun 27, 2013
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Robert P: I have the small brewer and get coffee very strong. The difference between Pippy and I, is that I brew for 24 hrs at room temperature..
Robert
Jun 27, 2013
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Scott M: Brew for longer like 36 hours. I have never refrigerated it so not sure if that slows down the absorption try leaving it at room temperature. Jun 27, 2013
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Alan S: I brew in the refrigerator for three days and transfer to an airtight container which I use for the three days while the next batch brews. Jun 27, 2013
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Nell I: Let it steep for 24 hours -- definitely will be stronger! Maybe a finer grind? Or a different coffee? Jun 27, 2013
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Steve B: I definitely recommend a 24 hour brew. I don't know if you will get a full flavor with only 12 hours. Jun 27, 2013
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Steven C asked: If one would wish their coffee from this pot to be hot, how would you recommend warming the coffee? By adding hot water, by using a warming plate or microwave? Mar 20, 2013
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terry s: the latter 2. adding hot water would dilute the coffee . using hot water in the cold brewing process would defeat the purpose of cold brewing as the hot water would increase the acid content. all in all your end result would probably be bitter coffee since this process would let the grounds sit in hot water for much too long. once the oils have been stripped from the grounds you want the slag away from your produced coffee like a French press or espresso machine does. by defeating the design of this pot, you're going to have your coffee sitting directly in the slag.

heat the coffee after it has brewed on the stovetop or in the microwave.

this process is designed for cold coffee. cold brewing creates an intense & deeper coffee since the water never gets above 108 degrees and therefore doesn't produce bitter acids. a French press would probably be better idea if your preference is hot coffee.
Mar 24, 2013
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Chris H: Hi Steven,
I keep the concentrate in the refrigerator, so it's pretty cold at the get-go. I usually add water from the tap and then microwave the entire thing for about 1:50. Depending on how dark the concentrate is, I'll do 1/3 - 1/2 concentrate and the rest water. If you add just hot water, you'd want to make sure it's pretty hot to get the temperature of the concentrate up before drinking.

If you're drinking the concentrate alone, I'd say you could microwave or or put on a hotplate to bring it up to your preferred temperature.

Hope that helps!
Mar 20, 2013
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Angella K: I wouldn't recommend adding hot water. That will only dilute the coffee and probably still won't be the correct temperature. I also would not use the microwave, as those alter the makeup of coffee and anything else that you put in them in an unnatural and harmful way (try watering a plant with water that you've microwaved, and you will see it perish, for example).

I'd say use a tea kettle or put the coffee in a small sauce pan and warm on the stove.

Hope this is helpful!
Mar 20, 2013
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Samuel L: I have never tried to heat up the coffee by microwave nor warming plate, but I did put hot water into to turn it into a cup of regular coffee. It depends on the coffee you use and the time you brew, but generally, I recommend the coffee-water ratio of 1:1 to put it at a balance of temperature and flavor. Enjoy your pot, I enjoy mine very much. Cheers! Mar 21, 2013
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Steven C: Thanks everyone for the tips! Looking forward to receive my Hario next week and start brewing. I doubt if I'll be diluting it as I prefer strong coffee. Oh and Ginger, I'm a firm believer that everything is best served pure, once anything is added to coffee...well, it just ain't coffee any more.

Thanks again!
Mar 20, 2013
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Gwen D: I ad very hot water from my automatic Franke hot water tap along with a 60 second zap in my microwave cause I like it hot. I sip at it for an hour our so. No acid taste buildup and I truly enjoy the taste. I love the pot size as it just makes enough to last me 1 week. 5 star in my book!! Mar 21, 2013
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Ginger P: On the rare occurrence that I drink coffee hot, I usually microwave about 2/3 of a cup of hot water and then add some of my cold brewed concentrate. But if you're not drinking it iced with 2% milk and a little cream, you're missing the boat! Mar 20, 2013
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Marc L: Since the coffee that is made is a concentrate you are most likely want to pour it into a mug dilute it and heat it up in a microwave. That's what I do at least and it turns out pretty darn good. Mar 20, 2013
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Siao Ming A: You can, but not in the glass vessel. You need to warm it in another sauce pan or in a microwave safe cup.

To be honest, the coffee is meant to be served cold.
Mar 20, 2013
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Steven B: I store it in the refrigerator and microwave in a mug or Pyrex measuring cup as needed. I never dilute with water as it is already a mellow flavor. Mar 20, 2013
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Dennis L: I just pour a cup full & heat it up in the microwave. Mar 20, 2013
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beth g asked: I am thinking that the larger brewer would better suit my coffee needs but did read in one of the reviews that the larger container yields weaker coffee as the filter is the same size on both models. Any experienced advice? May 20, 2013
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Barbara B: Depends on how much coffee you put in the filter section. Found set of instructions from Hario for smaller unit that calls for 50 grams, the larger one calls for 80 g. I simply fill it to top of the screened section for the large pot..

Two issues yet to fully resolve. Whether all the water should go through the filter, takes time, or fill the filter once and then add water to the pot. Theoretically it seems the first method, all water through the filter, should be a better choice, but takes patience.

Secondly i have seen comments to use the french press grind and another to use medium fine, usually the pre-ground stuff. Tried both, but no conclusions. So far the only difference seems to be a little bit of sediment on bottom of thepot. I use the pre-gound when I can't find whole beans that I like. (Common, given where I live.)

One final comment. Having tried the french press and the mason jar techniques, the Hario is such a blessing to clean. Worth every penny.
May 20, 2013
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Chris H: Hi Mary,
Yes, I ordered the bigger unit because I like making a lot of coffee concentrate. Despite tinkering with different beans, grinds and brewing times, I was getting weak coffee results. I called the store and asked Gayle to look if the filter size was the same on both the big one and the small one -- it was.

I smaller unit produces a concentrate that is comparable to the Toddy (if you've ever used one) so it's a bit thicker and can be diluted with water. The larger carafe made an okay tasting cup, but it could definitely not be diluted and was still a bit weak for my own personal taste.

I haven't ordered the smaller unit yet but hope to soon to test the difference.

Hope that helps!
May 20, 2013
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Kevin C: I have both sizes, but don't notice a strength difference if you follow instructions. While the filter basket thingie is identical, you use coffee grounds in proportion to the water volume. I.e., 50g coffee for 600mL water = 12mL per gram and 80g coffee for 1000mL water = 12.5 mL per gram. I read a few reviews which recommend using as much coffee as possible, but the filter will only hold slightly more coffee than the 80g recommended for the 1L pot. And if the coffee isn't strong enough, leave it in a little longer. This technique doesn't ruin the flavor even if you "brew" for at least 2-3 days. Then again, you'll be extremely wired if you brew that long. May 20, 2013
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Scott M: That is what I understand as well. I would think you would yield the about same amount of coffee but not have to dilute it as much using the larger one. I like mine strong so let it brew for at least 36 hours. Then dilute anywhere from 1/3 coffee 2/3 water to 50/50. The larger would probably just have to add 2/3 coffee to 1/3 water or brew less and drink almost full strength if you like mild coffee. May 20, 2013
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Steven B: Both have the same filter but you are suppose to put less coffee in it. The instruction are in Japanese but the large brewer requires 85 grams of coffee. The largest contributor to the strength that I have found is grind of the coffee. A medium grind seems to work best. A course grind is weak. Too fine of a grind packs together and prevent water flow through the grinds and is also weak. Jun 4, 2013
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Kate E: Hi it depends on the quality of coffee and grind size - so no matter what size you buy I think you can adjust strength I find the coffee to be very smooth if cold brewed - the larger size also makes enough for a few days since you can put in the refrigerator -hope that helps . May 20, 2013
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Dennis L: I have not used the smaller size, but it makes sense that it would be stronger. The coffee from the large size is good, but if you like really strong coffee, I would get the small size. May 20, 2013
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Alan S: Have not experienced that. I do tend to swirl the pot from time to time when I open the fridge. I'm actually dreading having to drink hot brewed coffee on vacation next week. May 20, 2013
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Phillip C: I let mine go for two days and nice and smith.
Phil
May 20, 2013
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Wilfred L: I think I agree the larger brew would be better. May 20, 2013
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Barbara B asked: I'm concerned about the nylon filter - does it leach toxins into the coffee like plastic does?
And where is the glass made? If it's China it most likely has lead in it, so would prefer glass made in the
U.S. or Europe. Thanks!
Mar 12, 2014
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Terry M: It is true that some plastics leak toxins, but most do not break down until around 300 degrees. But not all researcher agree as to what level or if that level of toxicity is reached. However, paper filters for tea and coffee have been found to contain toxins and pesticides.
The glass is from China; however the glass is 'Borosilicate' glass is supposed to be toxin free.
Hope this helps.
Mar 13, 2014
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Nell I: The pot is definitely made in Japan (there's a sticker on it that says so.)
As for the nylon, I believe nylon is safe at cold temperatures (which is what you will fill the pot with.). Food grade nylon is supposed to be inert up to 400 degrees (says MotherEarthNews).
Mar 13, 2014
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Ben M: My personal opinion is that there are enough problems with coffee itself that you should worry more about drinking it, than the POSSIBILITY of nylon leaching into the coffee. Frankly, I think that's a minor worry.

Also, because the Hario is a "Cold Brew" pot, the absence of boiling water pretty well insures that you're not going to leech out anything from the nylon filter.

As to the glass, who knows. The pot is made in Japan if that is any comfort. Also, because you're not using boiling or hot water, any lead leeching should be little to none. If you are REALLY concerned, then after brewing is complete, pour the coffee out of the pot into something you're more comfortable with and store it in in the fridge.

In summary, I think you're trying to pole vault over any hills.
Mar 13, 2014
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Wilfred L: Made in Japan. Mar 13, 2014
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Barbara B: Thank you! Mar 13, 2014
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A shopper asked: Can you also brew tea in this brew pot? Jan 13, 2013
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Kandis H: Hello,

I absolutely love this cold brew pot! However, I have only tried brewing coffee , not tea. I am sure it would work just as well with tea though. If you have half a day or 24 hrs to wait on your coffee/ tea then this cold brew pot is WELL worth your patience.

Easy to clean, doesn't take up space, inexpensive, doesn't leave your coffee with a bitter taste, comes out tasting smooth AND I rarely have that coffee aftertaste in my mouth.

I think the only negative comment I have would be that I am sure in a year or so I will need to replace the filter. Other than that I would say get it!!<3

Help this helps even though I haven't used my cold brew for tea.

Good Luck!!
Jan 14, 2013
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Scott M: I have not tried tea, however I don't see why not. It has a fine mesh filter to trap loose tea. The only issue I can see is that you would need about 14 oz min of water in the pot in order for the tea to be submerged as the filter doesn't got to the bottom of the pot. Jan 14, 2013
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Ben M: There is no reason why not? Put hot water in the pot up to the 500 ml line and your tea or tea bag in the filter. Insert filter into pot and slowly add more hot water. Time according to tea instruction or your taste. Jan 14, 2013
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Angella K: Yes, you might need to play with the ratios of tea to water. I doubt that you would fill the entire filter basket with loose tea for example. Perhaps filling it half-way would be sufficient. Jan 15, 2013
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Siao Ming A: Yes it can be used for brewing tea. Jan 14, 2013
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Nuccio N asked: Can I get written instructions in English on the Hario 1000 ml cold brew ? Jul 10, 2012
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Kaylie KStaff: Unfortunately we do not have English instructions on the Hario Cold Brew Pots, but we have a video and some basic instructions on the product page, which I have pasted below:

How the Hario Cold Brew Pot Works
Using coarse-ground coffee, fill the nylon filter basket until you've reached the top of the filter itself, leaving room at the top.
Pour filtered, cold or room temperature water over the grounds.
Leave to steep for 12-24 hours, less or more to taste.
Refrigerate completed coffee in a sealed container for up to one month.
Jul 25, 2012
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Jack Z: Written instructions in both English and Japanese are now available on the Hario web site at:
http://www.hario.jp/coffee/coldbrew.html

It''s a PDF file so you can also save it locally or print it.
Jun 9, 2014
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MikeMikeS: And if you do some easy and clever search-engine searching, you can find other instructional videos and, indeed, some written product instructions on the web . . . . Dec 12, 2012
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A shopper asked: Is this made of glass? Mar 24, 2012
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terry s: to be specific, it's lab glass with a thermal shock resistance of over 120E. this company makes lab glass - think of Pyrex. not sure if it's Borosilicate or soda lime glass. Mar 24, 2013
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Kaylie KStaff: Yes, the main body material of the Hario Cold Brew Pot is glass. Mar 26, 2012
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A shopper asked: Does this product's filter contain BPA? Jul 2, 2013
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Teri KStaff: Unfortunately we have not received written confirmation from Hario that their products are BPA free. The Sowden brewers can handle hot or cold brew coffee, and have no plastic parts. I have included a link to them below, along with a link to an article Kat wrote regarding BPA. Hope this helps!

http://www.seattlecoffeegear.com/sowden-softbrew-coffee-maker-with-scoop

http://blog.seattlecoffeegear.com/2010/12/07/the-abcs-of-bpa/
Jul 6, 2013
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Looking for warranty, care information, or videos of this product? You're in the right place!

 

Warranty Information for the White Paper Filter for Hario Drippers - Pack of 40

What it Covers:

Pour over coffee makers and grinders

Length: 1 Year
Who Supports the Warranty: Sungarden Tea
Warranty Contact Information: 626.202.0323
Eligible for SCG Extended Warranty? No

Caring for the Hario Coffee Dripper V60

Hand wash both filter and carafe as needed with hot water and soap.


Best coffee I've had

Review by
55
Quality
Price
Value

Great price, communication and shipping and the coffee pot is amazing!

(Posted on 8/26/14)

Great Product and Price!

Review by
3.66666666666675
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Price

The pot is pretty much what you would expect and is simple to use. Cold Brew is delicious, and it's time for you to up your coffee game if you're still on that drip system.

(Posted on 7/3/14)

Good...

Review by
45
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Price
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I have the 1000 ml size and overall am quite happy but I wish that there was a 1500 ml carafe. I am experimenting with just using enough coffee to fill the filter around 80% as opposed to up to the very top. I'm also trying 'fine' ground coffee to see if there is a noticeable difference.

I am considering a Bodum 'Bean Set' ice coffee maker that was reviewed by SCG in July '11 ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=saTkXdBlfLk ). This has a 1.5 L capacity and the shape of the carafe may be a more convenient fit with my refrigerator. Bodum's US site does not have the 'Bean Set' but it can be found for $30. Not sure why Bodum lists this model as an 'ice' coffee maker when it appears to be similar in design to their other French presses.

(Posted on 6/28/14)

Awesome

Review by
55
Price
Value
Quality

I love this thing. I never liked ice coffee made from hot coffee. Pour some cold brew over ice, it's delicious. If you happen to spill a little Kahlua in, even better... Yum.

(Posted on 3/28/14)

I really like this thing!

Review by
55
Quality
Price
Value

Its super easy to use, just make sure you read the instructions here and not on your box because they are all in Japanese! I use an espresso roast with it and make Ice coffee. It comes out way better than almost any Dunkins or Starbucks Iced coffee. Definately worth the purchase and its cheaper here than Amazon!

(Posted on 4/5/13)

cold brew coffee with a chocolate simple syrup.

Review by
55
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Price
Value

this system makes perfect daily coffee. it's that simple. you will taste distinct notes in your coffee that you missed brewing the same coffee a different way.

it becomes almost a zen practice in the morning which i look forward to. it was a constant experiment until I found my formula - Dark French Roast which I medium grind then add a chocolate simple syrup described below. absolutely yummy! My morning ritual was to go out for coffee every morning before work. now I can't stand the bland taste of barista prepared coffee. I love my own brew so much better.

fill the basket between 1/2 & 3/4. any more & you're wasting coffee as it produces a crust that will sit out of the water and not add to the process (unless you check it nightly & break up the crust which would be tedious). less and you'll make a weaker coffee & wonder what all the fuss was about.

pour water over the ground while stirring with a chopstick. you want the coffee to be a thick, saturated mud. if you don't do this, you'll notice a clump of thickened slag when you dump the basket. these grounds didn't add to your coffee and were wasted. fill to near the top. the grounds should be saturated mud for full effect as opposed to a damp crust. cover and stick in the frig for 12-24 hours to steep.

next morning pull the basket up & let it drain before dumping. a quick water spray upside down in the sink cleans it out.

now here's my trick - in a jigger add a teaspoon of Ghirardellis double chocolate powder. add a shot of milk. shake it up. then add a small squirt of agave or simple syrup ( honey clumps & changes the flavor of the coffee too much, sugar doesnt dilute fully) then shake that up. don't be lazy & add them all together since the powder will clump with the syrup & you'll wind up with chocolate spittle.

add this mixture to taste to your cold brew coffee. it is a chocolate simple syrup that dilutes completely into the cold coffee & makes it really delicious.

(Posted on 3/24/13)

Be careful which size

Review by
4.33333333333335
Quality
Price
Value

I got turned on to cold brew with the Toddy system which creates a great cold concentrate but uses a full pound of coffee and the filter clogs way too easy.

The Hario is a much simpler set up and is much sturdier compared to the Toddy. The filter basket is rinsable and reusable and make the process easy as pie.

A word of warning, however. I got the larger model Hario and wasn't getting good, dark concentrate (I like to mix with water to reheat to hot coffee). Although it's pretty dark, the brew doesn't come out as a concentrate and is almost too light for me to drink straight (I like a dark coffee).

I checked with the store and they confirmed the basket size is the same on both the 500 ml and the 1000 ml bottles, so if you like a heaver concentrate, you may want to try the smaller size first.

Overall this is a quality product at a good price. I just wish I would have known about the filter size before purchasing.

(Posted on 1/24/13)

Absolutely LOVE my Hario!

Review by
55
Price
Value
Quality

I am a hot beverage wimp, therefore my go-to coffee is iced coffee. I previously owned a Toddy. It was a nice introduction to iced coffee, but the filter would sometimes clog and cleanup was a bit messy. The Toddy also brews a large amount of coffee (even when I cut the proportions in half) leaving me with a pot left in the fridge for more days that was probably optimal. Enter the Hario. Oh my goodness!! This thing is a BREEZE!! I believe others have already mentioned it but what you want is 80 grams of course ground coffee in the filter and then you add 1125 milliliters of water. I use a trick similar to that of the Toddy. I add maybe 1/3 of the grounds to the filter and then pour water over it to thoroughly saturate. Then add another 1/3 or so of the grounds, then add more water. Then finally the remaining grounds and water. This ensures that the grounds get evenly saturated without any need to stir. I also have no trouble getting all the water to pour through the grounds (I do not lift the filter out and pour water into the container). This larger capacity Hario brews the perfect amount for me to use up in about 3 days and cleanup is a snap compared to the Toddy! I just take the filter and knock it inside a trash bag, give it a quick rinse in the sink and I'm good to go! I cannot recommend this product highly enough!

(Posted on 12/28/12)

Great way to brew

Review by
4.33333333333335
Price
Value
Quality

wonderful way to make coffee with quality glass and filter, try making coffee this way: your best coffee will taste very different and better.
I used the Verona Twilight with splendid results.

(Posted on 12/22/12)

Wow - where has the pot been all my life?

Review by
55
Price
Value
Quality

This pot is a jewel and is ideal for anyone who suffers from the acid effects of "normal" coffee. It's easy to use and makes enough concentrated coffee to last about a week. There are no English instructions, but here is one version from a reader @Amazom.com:

Making your coffee:
Before starting: Use coarse or "French Press" ground coffee in your Hario Cold Brew system.
- Pro Tip: Use your favorite coffee. You'll be surprised at how much better it tastes!
1. Fill your Hario glass pot to the 800 ml line with quality cool water. Remember: coffee is 99% water. Using icky-tasting water will result in icky-tasting coffee.
2. Fill the filter assembly with ground coffee just until the filter mesh is totally covered. (directions say 80ml, but meh)
3. Place the filter assembly into the glass pot.
4. Pour additional water through the grounds until the glass pot is completely full and grounds are wet.
- Optional: give the grounds a stir with a plastic straw or chopstick. (I never bother)
5. Place the pot cover onto the pot. It will click into place.
6. Let the pot rest! You can keep it on your kitchen counter for up to 12 hours. If you'd like a stronger steep, place the pot in the fridge and allow to chill for up to 24 hours. (I go 12 hours on the counter. No more than 75 degrees F, though. So, hot nights, put it in the fridge)
7. Remove the filter and enjoy your coffee concentrate!

For hot coffee, I mix 1 part coffee concentrate to 1 part boiling water.
For iced coffee, I fill a glass with ice and mix in 2 parts coffee concentrate to 1 part milk.

(Posted on 11/19/12)

great!

Review by
45
Quality
Price
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I discouvered this on this website! what a difference! making hot espresso then adding ice cubes?? what was i thinking? this make a great coffee-i've had to try different blends-went back to my espresso blend...Easy!!!

(Posted on 8/1/12)

Couldn't be happier!

Review by
55
Price
Value
Quality

I have no more use for my French Press or Automatic Drip coffee maker. This is the best little gadget ever!

I didn't even measure the amount of coffee I put into the strainer: just poured in coarse-ground coffee until it completely filled in the mesh area. I put 800ml of fresh filtered water into the carafe, popped in the strainer with ground, then poured water over the grounds to top it off. Gave it a swirl and let it sit on the counter for 12 hours.

I'm normally a 1 sugar guy... 2 sugars if its sub-par coffee. I didn't need any sugar! I filled up a mug half way with coffee from the carafe and topped it off with hot water for a great eye-opener in the morning.

In the afternoon, I filled a glass with ice, added coffee about 3/4 of the way up and topped it off with whole milk. Fantastic!!

Cold brewing definitely brings out more of the subtle flavors present in your favorite coffee. I only wish I'd discovered this cold-brew system earlier!

Plus: Seattle Coffee Gear has this system cheaper than anywhere else I've seen.

(Posted on 7/16/12)

Great product

Review by
55
Quality
Value
Price

Great product. A friend recommended Hario and it does not disappoint. Just find the right blend(s), coffee ratio, and most importantly the right coarseness of the coffee grind.

Pros:
Great Taste, Easy To Use, Commercial Grade, Quiet, Large Water Container, Easy To Clean

Cons:

(Posted on 4/4/12)

yummy

Review by
55
Quality
Value
Price

i gave this as a gift to my sister who only likes coffee cold. i was thinking she would never listen to me and would stick to her old ways of pouring hot coffee over ice. i was WRONG! she not only uses it daily, but asked me for a second one so she can have two going at once. i have to admit on a hot summer day that cold brew is really refreshing! maybe we both learned something? thanks SCG! :-)

Pros:
Easy To Use

Cons:
You will want more than 1

(Posted on 11/21/11)

Hario Cold Brew - good stuff

Review by
45
Quality
Value
Price

Instructions where in Japanese (the icons led me thru most of it. Love the sleeping refrigerator) but I found English version online. Very easy to use. I suggest holding the bottom of the carafe as you poor as the handle seems a tad light for weight once filled. Depending on the coffee you use, you may have to run the brew through a filter before consumption. The taste of cold-brewed coffee is tremendous. Love it. Price was right as I'm not going to brew this everyday.

Pros:
Easy To Use, Great Taste

Cons:

(Posted on 8/15/11)

Great for easy iced coffee

Review by
55
Quality
Value
Price

I love a good cup of iced coffee in the spring and summer. The Hario cold brew pot has taken over as my preferred method of brewing iced coffee. I used a Toddy Coffee Maker all last year with good results, but that was before I started roasting my own coffee. With the Toddy I was stuck brewing a pound of coffee at a time and drinking the same brew for 1-2 weeks. The Hario lets me brew less coffee so that I can switch between roasts more often.

The process I use could not be easier. I drop 80g of freshly ground coffee into the strainer, and then place the strainer in the pot. I pour cold water over the grounds slowly up to the top of the white filter (it should take approximately 1000ml or 33.8oz). I give the grounds a light stir and then place the brewer in the refrigerator. Hario's instructions say to extract for 8 hours, but I have done up to 12 and gotten good results. Once it's done brewing I pull out the strainer and discard the grounds. The cold brew coffee is good for 2-3 days, but I am lucky if it lasts a day in my house. I enjoy mine black or mixed with a little milk and Vanilla or Caramel Monin syrup.

Pros:
Easy To Use, Easy To Clean, Great Taste

Cons:

(Posted on 3/16/11)

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