Make a better cup of coffee!

A Latte Art Journey with Dori of Seattle Coffee Gear

Learning how to pour perfect hearts and gorgeous rosettas definitely takes some practice. And while your local barista is practicing while they pour hundreds of lattes each week, you're practicing with just a few lattes each day. We wanted to show how much time it might take to get the hang of latte art if it isn't your full time job, so we asked Dori to experiment with us!

Over the course of a few months, Dori made a couple of lattes each time she was at work and then we checked in with her every so often to see her progress. Watch her begin to develop her latte art skills using the Rocket Giotto Evoluzione.

Share This Story

2 thoughts on “A Latte Art Journey with Dori of Seattle Coffee Gear ”

  • VITO

    aRT IS SO SUBJECTIVE. ;) gOOD JOB.. mY QUESTION IS MORE ON THE TECHNICAL SIDE. i SEE YOU ARE NOT USING A THERMOMETER. wHAT IS THE BASIC TECHNIQUE? wHAT i HAVE FOUND IS i 'STREACH' THE MILK TO AROUND 80-90 DEGREES SPINNING AND ADDING AIR. ONCE i GET THERE i PLUNGE AND LET IT HEAT TO 140-150. AS I'M PULLING THE SHOTS. mOST CASES, MY MILK IS VERY THICK AND i DON'T GET GOOD ART. BUT IT SURE TASTES GOOD.

    (SORRY ABOUT CAPS. FOR SOME REASON I'M STUCK IN CAPSLOCK, WITH OR WITHOUT THE KEY PRESSED. )

    Reply
    • Kat

      Hi Vito -

      We steam to 140F as, as you go hotter, the proteins start to break down. You might want to try working the milk together more so that it becomes a wet paint type of texture before you pour.

      Let me know how that goes and if I can help in any other way. Thank you!
      -Kat

      Reply
Leave a Reply
close

Join our email list

GET 10% OFF ONE ITEM

Be the first to learn about exclusive offers and new products - starting today!

 

JOIN
*Some exclusions apply. See coupon for more details.