Ascaso

  • Crew Review: Ascaso Basic Espresso Machine

    Basic gets a whole new definition with the Ascaso Basic Espresso Machine! Sure, it’s simple design and easy to use controls are the fundamentals, but this little machine comes with more accessories for budding baristas to grow their technique; the Basic includes both non-pressurized, pressurized and pod baskets to adapt to anyone’s barista skills.
  • Crew Review: Ascaso Dream Up V2.0

    Ascaso Dream Up V2.0One thing we like a lot about Ascaso is that they frequently update their machines to ensure that they allow you to produce a better cup of coffee at home.  As result, we’ve seen a lot of different versions of this machine at SCG over the years. The last version, the Dream Up, incorporated a three-way solenoid valve into the machine and this most recent upgrade introduces a thermoblock to the espresso maker as well. We were excited to see the update to the Ascaso Dream Up V2.0 since the machine previously used a traditional style boiler, which our repair department noticed had to get replaced quite frequently. With this improvement, the espresso machine should have a longer life span and be much faster as well.

    In addition to the faster brewing time, we also like that the Ascaso Dream Up V2.0 comes with a lot of options for actually creating your coffee. With both single and double pressurized and non-pressurized portafilter baskets, as well as basket for E.S.E. pods, this machine accommodates people who are just getting to coffee and those who are old pros. Better yet, you even have a choice when it comes to how you want to steam your milk, as there steam arm tips for both a panarello and a standard steam arm.

    The one draw back some people may find with this espresso machine is that it tends to have soupier pucks than other machines with three-way solenoid valves. This is due to the spring and the ball valve in the brew head. This setup ends up sealing the brew head, so that the three-way solenoid valve can’t go all the way to your portafilter to return that pressure to enable the puck to dry out more completely. However, with some many other great features on this machine, the soupier pucks are not a deal breaker for us.

    It is no surprise this machine has remained as part of our lineup for so many years. Even though the Ascaso Dream Up V2.0 is a fairly simple in design, it performs very well and is easy to use because it doesn’t have an excessive amount of bells and whistles. Thus, if you like brewing shots out of your portafilter and are not a big fan of superautos, this is the machine for you. Likewise, with its retro styling and aluminum metal casing, which will hold up to nearly anything, this machine will look great on your counter top. We also love that this little semi-auto comes in a ton of fun colors like cow print and baby blue in addition to the more traditional polished aluminum and gray.

    To see how this the machine looks in action, watch as Brendan and Gail give it a whirl. We’ll even let you in on a little secret; the stylish look of the Ascaso Dream Up V2.0 made it the machine Brendan picked when asked which espresso maker he would buy out of our showroom during his interview.

    Crew Review: Ascaso Dream Up V2.0

  • Espresso Machine Storage Tips

    Leaving your machine alone for the winter? Need to store it or move it (by hand) to a new location? Gail gives us some tips on what you should do to prepare your machine so you limit the possibility of damage.

  • Ascaso Dream UP: Boiler Refill & Temperature Surfing

    The most frequent repair issue we see on Ascaso Dream machines (both the older version and the new UP) is a burned out boiler. These machines are single boilers without an automatic boiler refill, so folks often burn out the boiler because they don't pull enough fresh water into the boiler before trying to steam or brew.

    Watch Gail as she walks us through refilling the boiler and temperature surfing on the Dream UP.

  • Ask the Experts: Which Machines Need to be Backflushed?

    Cleaning and maintenance is a hot topic in this neck o' the woods, but some folks aren't clear on which specific maintenance routines apply to the type of machine they own. This comes up specifically in regard to backflushing -- do you or don't you?

    You do backflush if you own a machine with a valve system referred to as a three-way solenoid, brew pressure release, three-way valve, solenoid valve or any other combination of these phrases. Not sure if your machine has this? If your machine has an E61 brew group (such as those on Rockets, Quick Mills, Izzos or Grimacs), it has this valve system. Other models that feature this without the E61 are those made by La Spaziale, Pasquini, the Rancilio Silvia and Ascaso's Uno Pro and Duo series. This valve system relieves pressure post-brew, which results in a drier puck, but it sucks a little bit of coffee and water into the system each time which can build up in there and adversely impact the machine's performance. Backflushing forces detergent and water through the valve system, thoroughly cleaning it and maintaining the system. It also has the added benefit of cleaning up behind the brew head's screen without taking it apart.

    You don't backflush if your machine doesn't have this system -- because you don't have the valves to clean! Some machines that don't need backflushing include the Saeco Aroma, Via Venezia, Sirena, models made by Breville, those from Francis Francis/illy and Delonghi and Capresso semi-automatics. But since you're not forcing detergent through the brew head, you will need to take it apart semi-regularly to clean up behind the brew screen.

    The best way to determine if you need to backflush your machine is to read the manufacturer's manual and the machine's technical specifications to see if it has the valve system. If it doesn't, you're good to go; if it does, you should backflush once every 1 - 2 weeks, depending on how often you use the machine.

    Not sure how to do it? Watch us backflush the Rocket Giotto E61 or the Rancilio Silvia.

  • Ask the Experts: What's a Panarello?

    Creating a silky microfoam can be a challenging enterprise: Even with the higher end prosumer machines we sell, it is arguably the most difficult skill to learn and sometimes takes more practice (and patience!) than folks expect from the outset.
  • Crew Review: Ascaso i-Steel Grinder

    If you're looking for a stepless burr grinder with a small footprint and all metallic casing, Ascaso's I-Steel is a great option. It's simple, easy to use and allows you infinite adjustment to truly dial in your grind. Additionally, even its chute is metal -- unlike the plastics often found on other machines -- and some people really dig that. This comes with either flat burrs (i-Steel I-1) or conical burrs (i-Steel I-2).

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  • Ask the Experts: Can I use Lemon Juice to Descale my Machine?

    DIY lovers are all into the idea of using lemon juice or vinegar to descale their machines, but while the latter will leave a nasty residue and we don't recommend it for that reason, the former just isn't concentrated enough to do as an effective job in as an efficient manner as a concentrated citric acid solution like Dezcal. This is what we find out from Gail, plus she makes freaky faces and it's worth watching just for that.

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