roasters

  • Guide to Holiday Roasts - Part 2

    We took a look at some holiday roasts in part one of this feature, and we're back with several more! Check out these toasty brews for some tastes of the season!

    Espresso Republic - Cabin Fever Blend

    Espresso Republic offers an excellent holiday espresso roast in Cabin Fever. Listing tasting notes like root beer, molasses, and anise, this is definitely a unique roast. We love the holiday spice flavors present in this one for sure. The root beer notes listed come from a sweet nip at the front of the palate. This combined with the rich body and molasses notes, plus the aforementioned spice creates a very tasty brew! As we said, this is an espresso roast, so you'll want to enjoy it as such!

    Huckleberry Roasters - Sister Winter

    Sister Winter is a very simple roast, but perfect if you like a variety of brew methods. Press, pourover, and drip all offer a different take on these classic flavors. We even recommend this roast for superauto espresso machines! Chocolate and berry notes meet a toasty, pastry like aroma for a real crowd pleaser!

    Toby's Estate - Miracle on N. 6th St.

    Miracle on N. 6th St. is another one full of spice notes, but with a citrus twist. Celebrate the holiday citrus tradition with this roast, which features a blend of washed and natural process beans. We loved this one in a variety of brew methods too! Toby's lists notes of orange, cinnamon, and malbec, which we agree combine to create a satisfying holiday treat.

    49th Parallel Coffee - Holiday Edition

    49th lists fruity flavors like juice and apricot alongside a nutty roasted almond note. These flavors combine for a tasty mix of classic holiday flavors. We really love that this one offers that almond note, as the mild apricot flavors really combine in a mellow, but satisfying way. This one is definitely not designed for espresso, and we specifically recommend it as a filter brew. Great for a morning cup or a late night coffee beside the fire!

     

    Victrola Coffee Roasters - Holiday Blend

    Alongside cozy and cute bag art, this roast really satisfies. Victrola's tasting notes are chocolate, toasted pecan, walnut, and carrot cake. We love how varied and complex this blend is! The sweeter notes combine with the rich, nutty notes for a full bodied and delicious holiday roast. This roast uses natural process beans alongside washed process, so you'll notice hints of sweetness from the naturals and the nuttier notes coming from the washed beans. Recommended for filter brewing!

    Reverie Coffee Roasters - Christmas Cheer

    This one features delicious hot cocoa, baking spice, and roasted nut notes. These are really legendary holiday flavors and they combine for a predictable, but delicious blend here. We actually got peanut brittle notes from this one that we really loved! Definitely a richer blend, we recommend this one in a variety of different brew methods. And excellent all arounder that guests will love!

    Stay tuned, because we have ONE MORE holiday roast feature headed your way soon!

  • Roast of the Month: Ladro Roasting Myanmar Yay Chan Pyin

    It's time for another roast of the month here at SCG! This month we were excited by the unique flavors in Ladro Roasting's Myanmar Yay Chan Pyin! Read on for why:

    Unique and Delicious

    Myanmay Yay Chan Pyin comes to us from the Shan State region of Myanmar and the beans were grown at an elevation of 1,534 meters. Generally coffee from Myanmar features a big body with heavier flavor notes, and this is true here as well. What sets this coffee apart for us is just how complex it is. Sometimes we pick the smoothest or best all around cup, but in this case we definitely can't get over the range of notes going on with this roast.

    The nose on this roast is wildly complex, with earthy, sweet scents not quite overwhelming the senses. At the front of the coffee you really can taste the brown sugar notes. This sweetness reminds us of baking cookies or cake, but quickly gives way to the flavors imparted by the natural processing of these beans. That natural taste manifests as a tropical, fruity note that Ladro has identified as Guava. It's definitely different than the more berry notes that South American and African natural processing creates. We love it here. Finally, the earthier, cedar tones hit the back of the palate, rounding out this coffee nicely. You're left with a earthy, slightly tart, but overall smooth mouthfeel that is very satisfying.

    Brew Methods and Closing Thoughts

    Ladro recommends using a drip method or pourover for this roast, and we agree. It's a light one, so pourover is really the best way to tease out the roast's more complex notes and aromas.

    Like most coffee from Myanmar, this one is a micro-lot. That means it won't last forever and we have a limited stock! Snag a bag for yourself here!

  • Guide to Holiday Roasts Part 1

    Holidays bring a whole world of delicious holiday roasts! From warm, chocolatey blends to some exciting fruitier coffees, we're excited to share our 2018 holiday roast guide! This week, we'll take a look at 6 of the roasts we're featuring this year. We'll finish up with several more next week! Without further adieu:

    Caffe Ladro - Fireside

    Caffe Ladro's Fireside returns this year for a delicious cup of coffee to enjoy with friends and family around the fireplace. Our team has used words like "cozy," "classic," and "warm" to describe this delicious holiday blend. The molasses notes offer a indulgent sweetness with earthy, nutty notes on the finish. Definitely a delicious roast in a variety of brew methods!

    Velton's Coffee - Holiday Blend

    It's typical (and delicious) to get strong chocolate notes from holiday coffee roasts. While that makes for a familiar, warm, and inviting cup of coffee, Velton's brings us something a little different this year. This roast features delicious fruity notes like pineapple and lemon with berry flavors coming from the natural beans in the blend. We love how bold this roast is, and how much it stands out! Check it out as a drip or espresso!

    Tony's Coffee - Backcountry Blend

    For anyone looking for a darker roast this holiday season, check out Tony's Backcountry Blend. This coffee offers milk chocolate notes alongside more earthy flavors of toasted almond. What we liked about this blend is that it'll satisfy those looking for a darker roast without being too much for the medium roast drinker. This is a plus when looking for a coffee to share with others over the holidays! It also works for a variety of brew methods.

     

    Counter Culture Coffee - Iridescent

    The perfect gift blend, Iridescent features brilliant, giftable packaging and a striking look! That's not all though, this is a delicious blend of Colombian, Kenyan, and Ethiopian beans that makes for an accessible roast that will still provide some complexity. Predictable chocolate notes come from the washed process beans in this blend, with the natural beans lending a berry flavor. We love this roast in a variety of brew methods. What's more, Counter Culture is donating a nickel of every pound of coffee sold to charities in the producing countries!

    Dogwood Coffee - Snow Emergency

    Continuing the trend of blending natural and washed process beans, Dogwood's snow Emergency is a brilliant holiday entry. Natural process beans bring a berry, cherry flavor to this roast that's rounded out by traditional chocolate notes. This is a full bodied roast that won't overwhelm, and makes for an excellent drip brew.

    Kickapoo Coffee Roasters - Revelry

    For a brighter set of notes, check out Kickapoo's Revelry! This delicious medium light blend will please a wide range of coffee drinkers. We love the richness of this cup of coffee, but it doesn't overwhelm if you like lighter roasts. The smooth aroma is a delightful prelude to the richer flavors inside the roast too! Try it in a press or as a drip brew!

    Check back soon for more holiday roast notes!

     

     

     

  • Roast of the Month: Toby's Costa Rica Santa Teresa 2000

    Welcome to October's Roast of the Month, featuring Toby's Estate Costa Rica Santa Teresa 2000!

     

    Sweet and Creamy

    This roast is a true winner when it comes to balancing sweetness and mouthfeel. The beans in this coffee were processed using a technique called "honey-process". This is similar to the honeyed process you may have learned about in the past, where some cherry is left on the bean while drying. The "white" part of the term refers to the amount of mucilage left on the bean, and the length of time it is given to ferment. The result of this process and the roasting technique is a flavor profile similar to that of a natural, but less intense.

    For this roast, that means delicious sweet notes of caramel apple and cherry soda, alongside creamier, chocolatey notes. What we love most about this roast is the way these flavors bend around the palate. It makes for an intensely satisfying mouthfeel and a taste you'll want to experience again and again.

    As is often the case with naturals and honey processed roasts, brew method is key. We recommend trying this roast as a pourover first, to really get the most out of it. This brew method will give you a clearer understanding of the roast's notes. From there, try dialing it in to your espresso machine or press! Just avoid using these beans in a super-auto. While not very oily for a honey-process coffee, we still recommend sticking to blends in these machines to prevent clogging.

    Grab your bag of Toby's  Estate—Costa Rica Santa Teresa 2000 here!

     

  • Roaster Spotlight: Velton's Coffee Roasting Company—The Interview

    As noted last week, we had the great opportunity to sit down with Velton of Velton's Coffee Roasting Company to chat about roasting and coffee in general! Check out the full text of the interview below, or the video version above!

    Full Interview

    Seattle Coffee Gear: We’re here with Velton from Velton’s Coffee Roasting, how’s it going today sir?

    Velton: It’s good!

    SCG: Awesome, so you were kind enough to sit down with us and go through some questions about your process and about Velton’s! So my first question is what led you to get into roasting the first place

    Velton: I’d been in coffee quite a while, I’d been a barista for 10, 11 years or so, and where I was working at the time, I was managing Bauhaus Books and Coffee down on Capitol Hill in Seattle. They had opened Top Pot, and when they opened the second Top Pot they decided to get into roasting. They had enough of their own accounts at that point. I had told them a few years prior that if they did get into roasting that that was the next step that I wanted to take in coffee, and that I was very curious about it. To their credit when they opened the second Top Pot and put the roastery in they made me the head roaster. I didn’t know what I was doing for a while but we figured it out! That was around 2001.

     

    SCG: That’s a common theme I’ve heard. I know people who I work with and friends who are amateur roasters, everyone who really wants to get into roasting, but nobody really knows what they’re doing when they get started because it’s a complicated thing!

    Velton: It’s complicated and one roaster can supply a lot of coffee shops, so there just aren’t as many positions in roasteries as there are in coffee shops.

    SCG: Exactly. So in terms of how you run Velton’s, what do you look for when you’re purchasing green coffee?

    Velton: So we’ve got a few blends, we have to make sure we can maintain those. So there’s that. Then we always have about 8 different single origin offerings at a time. We try to keep a well-rounded offering of those. Some that are more approachable for folks, some that we feel will work well as espresso, some that are a little more wild that might still work for espresso but aren’t for everyone. So when we’re running low on some of those I’m trying to replace them with something similar. And always, of course, coffee is agricultural. So there’s different harvest seasons around the globe, so we’re always trying to buy what’s in season, as much as possible.

    SCG: So on that note, having some variety is maybe more important to you than specializing in a specific roast type, level, or origin?

    Velton: Definitely. I’m trying to have a little something for everyone. We always want to have a couple that are a little more wild, maybe bright. We also want something that’s very approachable, just nice filter cups of coffee. Something that, there’s a lot of coffees that taste great on a cupping table, but you might not want to drink a full pot of it. So we want one of those for someone if that’s what they’re looking for. So yea, variety is the goal.

    SCG: Do you have, regardless of whether you’re selecting coffee to roast, a process that you find, whether it’s washed, natural, or honey, that’s your favorite?

    Velton: It’s probably washed, that’s generally going to be my favorite, but there are exceptions to that. I definitely really enjoy naturals, and I think natural processing has gotten so much better. I like naturals a lot as espresso. As filter I might like four to six ounces, but it’s rare that I’m going to sit down and drink a pot of a natural. Again there have been exceptions, there have been outstanding ones that have come along.

    SCG: We kind of talk about the notion that the first time you have a natural your response is “how does anyone drink anything other than this? This is incredible!” Then you drink a hundred naturals and think “well that washed was really good though, maybe I do like the balance, and I do like that it’s a little bit easier to drink multiple cups.” Then eventually you hit a point where you think “well they’re both great, different times for different coffee.”

    Velton: I feel like that’s where I’m at. I like them all, as long as they do it well and the green was great to begin with, yea.

    SCG: Do you have any tips for ways to help develop your palate? That’s a question we get a lot.

    Velton: I think being conscious while you’re tasting the coffee. Even if you like cream and sugar, get in the habit of taking a few sips while it’s black. Let it cool a little bit, you’ll start to get more flavor as it cools. I think if you’re conscious about it while you’re drinking the coffee, and what you’re tasting. And it’s fine to cheat and look at the bag and see what they’re telling you you should be tasting. Then you just slowly build a vocabulary in your head that your palate starts to tie into.

    SCG: Do you have a favorite brew method for coffee?

    Velton: I would say my very favorite is pourover. I just feel like I get the clearest description of the coffee that way. But I totally love espresso. So my go-to is pourover when I really want to learn about a coffee, but I do love to see what it’ll do as espresso as well. It’s hard for me to find an espresso I don’t like.

    SCG: That’s generally how we approach coffee in house too, and how we recommend it to people. If there’s a really complex roast we always recommend it as a pourover because it’s the only way you’re going to get everything out of it.

    Velton: Yea, and usually the flavor descriptors are designed for that.

    SCG: Do you have any tips for somebody who maybe is an amateur roaster trying to turn it into a business?

    Velton: Definitely just keep tasting your roasts all the time. Try to trust your palate. If it’s your roastery, there’s so many ways you can roast a coffee and have it turn out well, but make sure you like what you’re doing and you’re not trying to roast just for your customers.

    SCG: This is one of my favorite questions. I don’t know how valuable it is, but it’s really interesting to me so I always ask it. Do you find that your environment has shaped the way that you roast? Or do you think that as a roasting culture develops it tends to guide the culture in coffee shops in a region.

    Velton: A little bit of both. I think they feed off each other. I’m not really sure.

    SCG: It’s a tough question, we’ve talked about it with folks in the past and I notice, being from the Midwest, from Detroit, the culture in coffee shops there is vastly different than what we find in the Pacific Northwest. While I haven’t spent a lot of time in coffee shops on the East Coast I know in New York it’s a very different vibe with roasters and with shops. I wonder how much local culture is influencing that, or if when you get into the specific parts of coffee culture there’s influence from roasters touching local coffee shops.

    Velton: I think in the Seattle area and the Pacific Northwest, we’ve had a pretty ingrained coffee culture. Maybe to a degree longer or greater than most elsewhere, but it was more dark roast oriented for a long time. A lot of the roasters that popped up over time have kind of modeled themselves that way and it’s taken a little longer. But I don’t feel it’s that way anymore. We have enough of a third-wave coffee culture in Seattle that the roasters that pop up now don’t feel like they’ve got to feed into the dark roast culture if they don’t want to. So it’s changing. It took us a little longer to change here maybe than elsewhere.

    SCG: That makes a lot of sense. This is probably a question that ties in with what you were saying about offering something for everybody. Do you ever find yourself chasing something with your roasts? Or do you generally let the coffee speak for itself and let it inform the way that you’re roasting?

    Velton: Again both. It’s kind of a two-way street where I have ideas up front about what I think this coffee will taste like so I roast based on that. Then I'll taste it and maybe take it in a different direction based on what I’m tasting. I definitely influence the coffee based on my expectations but then the taste will influence how I roast it right back. So they work together.

    SCG: My last question, and this is a hard question to answer, but do you have a favorite roast that you’ve done before?

    Velton: Favorite roast? No [laughs]. Every year there’s a couple of coffees that stand out to me. Sometimes they were ones that I didn’t expect them to be. More often than not if we buy a $30/lb geisha, and they’re hard to move so we don’t often to that, but quite often it’ll be the best coffee we’ve had for the year. Then other times you’ll get a $3/lb Peru that just blew everybody’s doors off. It was just so well balanced and had a little bit of everything going on. So every year we get a couple that stand out, but I wouldn’t say there’s one over the last ten years that’s the one.

    SCG: That’s a great answer! I appreciate your time!

    Velton: Thanks!

  • Roaster Profile: Velton's Coffee Roasting Company

    Velton's Coffee was one of Seattle Coffee Gear's first roasting partners. In light of this, we couldn't wait to sit down with them for another edition of our Roaster Profile series. This week we'll look at the history of Velton's roasting, with an interview with Velton himself to follow next week!

    Pacific Northwest Born and Raised

    Velton's Roasting is owned and operated by Velton himself in Everett, Washington. This industrious roaster starting working in coffee in Seattle Washington in 1989. Velton quickly developed a passion and desire to learn about everything coffee, from cupping to running a bar, and eventually to roasting.

    Since getting into the industry, Velton has been able to explore roles in coffee from the Pacific Northwest to Hawaii. Eventually, he found himself going from a desire to learn about roasting to making it a profession.

    Velton's Coffee Roasting Company

    Velton's philosophy is to try to offer a range of coffee rather than get tunnel vision on a specific roast level or origin. This results in a rich array of roasts that will sure please any coffee drinker. Between light, sweet single origins and darks singles and blends, Velton really does have a coffee for everyone.

    We love Velton because we're able to get candid, down to earth answers to questions without needing to read between lines. This openness and friendly style of communication makes it easy to enjoy partnering with this experienced, ever evolving roaster. Check out our range of Velton's roasts in our catalog, and check back next week for our full interview with the man himself!

  • Roaster Spotlight: Elm Coffee Roasters — Part 2

    As we teased last week, we recently had the opportunity to sit down with Brendan Mullally, founder of Elm Coffee Roasters, to chat about coffee, roasting, and running a business. We already provided a rundown of Elm last week, so without further adieu, check it out!

    What led you to roasting?

    I worked in coffee for about ten years before I started Elm, and I had no roasting experience! It was all front house management, training, all that kind of stuff. As to why, honestly it was just the flexibility in choosing what we want to serve. I did a lot of multi-roaster shops while I was managing, and it was never consistently what I wanted from coffee. The ability to determine what we serve was a huge part of it, ethical sourcing was a huge part of it, paying good prices was a huge part of it. I've worked in coffee since I was about 14 in Seattle, then Santa Fe, then New York. I had no roasting experience when I decided to open up a roaster! I hired someone to help.

    You talked a little about ethical sourcing, that’s important to us when determining roasting partners. Do you have a core philosophy surrounding this?

    I wouldn’t say it’s a philosophy, but more of a practical approach, which is work with importers I know are paying good prices, not just to the producers but to the pickers as well. There’s only a few, I would say. You know, asking for the information on the prices the pay to the producer, not everyone will do that, but some will. Some will give it to you in a price that doesn’t make sense, so being able to ask them to make that make sense to you is important.

    Would you say that getting into roasting shifted your view of the countries you source from, or the other way around, that you chose those countries based on your understanding of them?

    I would say the former. When I was just buying roasted coffee I, for one thing I don’t think my palate was as developed. After we started roasting coffee, if anything for logistics, we’ve narrowed our focus to Colombia, Guatemala, Ethiopia and Honduras, simply because if there’s more transparency in those places the price to quality ratio is a lot higher.

    I ask because it’s interesting how the politics of different regions affect the ability to purchase from them. When we write about regions, the instinct could be to avoid conversations on transparency and politics, but it’s also kind of impossible.

    I agree, and transparency is not something that just happens. Even though we try to do that, sometimes it’s not successful. That has a lot to do with politics.

    Everything else aside, when you look at quality of beans, what do you look for?

    First is nothing wrong with it. That’s the thing I learned first. 99.8% of coffees you can cut out immediately because they're agey, or fermenty, all sorts of things can go wrong with coffee. After that, something that’s a little more fruit forward with interesting characteristics. Sweet, clean, then we roast it to highlight the fruit. We’re pretty light, but I wouldn’t say we’re on the super light end of the spectrum. We try to have acidity and balance. That was the weirdest thing, picking coffee that’s clean was the weirdest and hardest part.

    What do you think was hardest when it comes to the business or art of roasting coffee?

    I would say from the business side, just getting started. I had no business experience. I wrote a business plan and showed it to a friend who who’s an entrepreneur and he said it was terrible, so I had to tear it up and write another 60 page plan. I learned how to make projections, all that stuff. I asked 15 different institutions for financing, it just took a long time. It took 2 years to open.

    On the roasting side, learning to cup well took a while. Especially sample roasts. I thought I had a pretty good palate when I was doing barista training, but, mine’s not even that great, our roaster John has a great palate. It’s just something you have to keep doing constantly.

    The last part was people management, that was hard to learn.

    What do you think the biggest ongoing challenge is?

    Well distinguishing yourself. There’s a lot of roasters these days. Roasting well, light roasting coffee is very hard. The window is extremely small, if it’s too light its sour and vegetal. We don’t particularly like roasty flavors in our coffee, so we don’t like to go that far. If anything we’ll edge a little more roasty if we can’t find that sweet spot.

    But otherwise, inventory control is hard, can’t buy too much, can’t buy too little. If we buy too little, prices go up, if we buy too much it gets agey.

    Was your initial setup similar to what you have now?

    This is what we had when we started! I hired my friend to help start the roasting program. He helped set up everything, taught me how to roast, everything.

    Do you have a favorite roast that you’ve done?

    That’s hard to say. I would say now, maybe just because we have it, I would say the Ethiopia Worka Sakaro is probably the nicest Ethiopian coffee we’ve bought in a long time. It’s extremely good. It’s really floral and fruity but not too bright, a big body.

    What would be your biggest piece of advice for amateur roasters looking to go pro?

    Man, hmm, know your market. Who you’re selling to. Don’t roast too light, don’t underdevelop the coffee. Have fun. It’s going to be really hard, but have fun. Harder than you think it’ll be, times 1000, but have fun. Don’t forget why you started in the first place.

  • Roast of the Month: Bluebeard Coffee Roasters — Santa Maria Yucuhiti

     

    This month's roast of the month is a delicious single origin from Bluebeard Coffee Roasters: Santa Maria Yucuhiti!

    This Mexican single origin features some enticing flavor notes, and definitely doesn't disappoint. We loved the rich and creamy taste of caramel and chocolate with the sweetness of blood orange. This washed process roast is also smooth enough to enjoy as a daily drinker, so consider grabbing a couple of bags more than you might for other single origins.

    As with many lighter single origins, the best way to enjoy this roast is as a pourover. This will allow you to get the most out of the coffee's more complex notes. It also helps control acidity, so that the flavors aren't overwhelmed with "coffee" taste. We think you might just love this roast enough to want a whole pot pourover to yourself! So check out Bluebeard's Santa Maria Yucuhiti here today! We're pretty sure it's a coffee you'll love!

  • Roaster Spotlight: Elm Coffee Roasters — Part 1

    Here at Seattle Coffee Gear we love to get to know the roasters that we partner with. It's real, genuine connections that fuel the coffee industry. We had the fantastic opportunity to sit down with Elm Coffee Roasters' owner and founder, Brendan Mullally, to talk all things coffee. We're excited to bring that to you next week. In the meantime we wanted to provide a bit of background for those who aren't familiar with this incredible roaster!

    Seattle Born and Raised

    After years of experience in the coffee industry in New York City, Brendan decided to move back home to found Elm. The cafe and roastery opened in 2013 in the heart of Seattle's Pioneer Square with a focus on providing great coffee in a great environment. In our opinion, they do just that. Elm specializes in light, delicate roasts packed with complex flavor. Between their desire to present interesting, drinkable coffee and their concern for ethical sourcing, we find it easy to recommend Elm's product.

    Of particular note is the atmosphere in the café. High ceilings, lively music, and a bustle of activity inside and out define the feel of a morning at Elm. Brendan explained to us that they're using the same equipment and space that they've been using since 2013, and the command that staff have over the machines is evident. From tasty, beautiful lattes to carefully crafted pourover, we can't recommend a stop by this café enough.

    None of this would matter, of course, if the coffee wasn't excellent.

    Light Roasts and Complex Notes

    One of the reasons we love Elm so much is because of their clear focus. Rather than try to check every box, this is a roaster that works to perfect a specific kind of roasting. They do this with coffee from specific places. They focus on coffee from Colombia, Guatemala, Ethiopia, and Honduras. These are countries that they've had the best success sourcing from at the right price. It also gives them the ability to dial in great roasts from each region year after year.

    As of the time of this writing, Elm's offer is 5 roasts. Two Ethiopias, two Colombians (one a decaf) and one seasonal blend. With some roasters, this would indicate a lack of availability. In Elm's case, it's because each roast is so very good.

    Of particular note this year is their Ethiopia Worka Sakaro.  We loved it so much that we featured it as our coffee of the month for July. This roast's notes of black tea, jasmine and lemon are all distinct and noticeable. This is a running theme with Elm's roasts, and it makes them a great roaster to work on your palate with.

    We're very excited to continue to work with Elm Coffee Roasters, and we hope you'll be happy to try them. Check out our selection of Elm roasts on our site here, and stay tuned next week for our full interview with Brendan.

  • Roast of the month: Elm Coffee Roasters—Ethiopia Worka Sakaro

    Delicate and Delightful

    This month's Roast of the Month is Elm Coffee Roasting's fantastic Ethiopia Worka Sakaro!

    An extremely delicate roast, this single origin offers an incredible combination of flavors that
    are exciting and interesting every time you brew. Upon opening a bag of Ethiopia Worka Sakaro you'll be met with aromas of vanilla, smooth coffee, and flowers. It's inviting and delicious even before and during brewing.

    The intensity of the floral and vanilla notes in this roast are striking for a washed coffee. An incredibly bright and delicate mix of flavors comes together across the palate to delight. The vanilla is smooth and direct, with floral notes hitting around the edges of the palate. All of this combines with a rich coffee flavor that is strong for a light roast. Because of this, Ethiopia Worka Sakaro is a great every day roast.

    While we love the flavors and aromas of this roast, like many other delicate and floral coffees we do strongly recommend brewing it as a pourover. We also recommend you pick up a couple of bags of this one! Since this roast is a single origin, it likely won't last forever!

    Grab a bag of Elm's Ethiopia Worka Sakaro here today!

     

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